Lindisfarne, Holy island of the north: Part 2

Welcome to Part two of the history of Lindisfarne. If you have missed the first part in which Lindisfarne was founded and became a religious, cultural and scholarly mecca, you can read the article here. Unfortunately for Lindisfarne, its rise … Continue reading

Lindisfarne, Holy Island of the north: Part 1

In the early 7th century, the death of King Edwin caused the kingdom of Northumbria to split amongst rival groups. This weakened state made it easier for Cadwallon the King of Gweynedd (northern Wales) to attack the land and under … Continue reading

Whitby through the ages

Summer, twilight, 1890: A man paces through an English seaside town. His long legs move briskly, alive with the thrill of the new discovery that propels him homeward to his writing desk. Bram’s mind ran through the scene he had … Continue reading

Palm Sunday

Palm Sunday is an important date in the Christian calendar. As the first Sunday before Easter it is the beginning of holy week and the lead up to Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection. The week started with Jesus arriving into Jerusalem on the Sunday, followed by his arrest by Thursday, his crucifixion on the Friday, and his eventual resurrection from the dead on Easter Sunday.

It is this first Sunday that we are celebrating today. Continue reading

Historical sources rundown

A lot of what we know about the history of the Dark Ages comes from written documents of the time such as land grants, wills, sagas, chronicles and annals either written during the period under study or soon after. For the information i need when writing historical fiction and blog posts i try and use these documents as much as other books and websites and i thought it would be a good idea to share some of these so that when i mention that we know so and so through the writings of such and such, you will know what i am talking about and hopefully understand a little bit about how we know so much about this time period, or more accurately so little. Continue reading

Save the Whithorn Trust

English: Archaeological dig, Whithorn Priory T...

English: Archaeological dig, Whithorn Priory The skeletons being unearthed were thought to be from about 1250 but it was going to take much more research to date them accurately. This was in 1990. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Whithorn Trust has set up a petition of support in the hope of being granted funding for their archaeological, historical and other research ventures that they provide for the Whithorn area and South-Western Scotland in general. Continue reading

Happy St Bede’s Day

That’s right everyone, 1,278 years ago today the man known as ‘The father of English history’ died in the monastery of Jarrow, Durham (although at the time it was in Northumberland as the shire of Durham did not yet exist).